Microsoft corrects course on Right to Repair

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Aaron Colonnese
Content Creator

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Content Creator

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.

Tech giant Microsoft is finally listening to the thousands of Americans who want the right to repair their stuff.

On Oct. 7, Microsoft announced a commitment to research the benefits of making repair tools and documentation available beyond its authorized repair network, and to then act on those findings by the end of 2022. The mission of Right to Repair is to give consumers and small businesses the necessary access to parts, tools and service information so they can repair their products themselves without having to pay an arm and a leg to the manufacturer. It helps both consumers (by reducing costs) and the environment (by reducing toxic electronic waste).

“Microsoft has come a long way, and it needed to” said PIRG Senior Right to Repair Campaign Director Nathan Proctor. “Over the last three years, PIRG members and supporters sent in nearly 20,000 comments to Microsoft calling on the company to embrace repair and stop punishing refurbishers."

"Every company should be aware that Right to Repair is coming. Now is the time to get ahead of the curve and embrace repair."

Read more.

Learn more about our campaigns to secure Americans' right to fix their stuff.

Photo: In 2018, Nathan Proctor hand-delivered more than 11,000 petitions calling on Microsoft to embrace Right to Repair. Credit: Ricky Osborn

Aaron Colonnese
Content Creator

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Content Creator

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.